Are there different opinions regarding the obligation to make kiddush shabbos morning before eating breakfast?
If someone is perfectly capable of davening without eating, however their overall physical and mental state will be improved if they eat breakfast, do they have to make kiddush before eating? Is saying the morning brachos sufficient?
Does this halacha change in regards to a male or female?
Does one need to make kiddush if they are only having a coffee?

Answer:

Before davening there is no obligation to make kiddush and hence no prohibition to eat without kiddush. However, before davening there is the general prohibition of eating before davening, which applies every day of the week. A drink of water,coffee or tea is permissible.

In very extenuating circumstances, one is very weak or ill, a pregnant or nursing woman who can not daven without eating, may eat before davening, what is necessary. In such a case brachos should be said first. There is no difference between men and women in this regard, except that commonly mothers of small children or pregnant often need to eat, as stated above. In addition many women are accustomed to saying a short davening, and hence may easily do so, and then eat afterwards [on Shabbos with kiddush].

After davening, any drink or food is prohibited until kiddush is made. This is true for a coffee as well. One who plans to only have a coffee must be sure to drink a full reviis of the grape juice or wine in order to fulfill kiddush bmakom seuda. Otherwise, a kzayis [small matchbox size] of mezonos must be eaten as well, with the kiddush.

Sources:

see here:    dinonline.org/2010/09/07/women-eating-before-kiddush/

dinonline.org/2010/06/06/eating-before-kiddush-for-girls/

Tags: eating before davening kiddush

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One Response to “Eating Before Kiddush and Davening”

  1. Rav Moshe has a chiddush that a woman can eat until her HUSBAND leaves the shul, since her obligation of Kiddush doesn’t set in until then.
    Plus, by Chabad Chassidim, it is accustomed to eat mezonos before davening, and so was the minhag of the Rebbe.

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