I am looking into selling energy for a multi level marketing company. Am I allowed to push a product that will save people money even if it is not the best deal out there. I have a repuatation for researching things thoroughlly and if I suggest something to someone they will trust that I am suggesting the best option for them. Since it saves them money but not the most they could save, am I allowed to sell for such a product?

Answer:

This is a somewhat delicate question, which relates to the prohibition of geneivas daas.

As the Shulchan Aruch rules (Choshen Mishpat 228), it is forbidden to give others a wrong impression, the more so where there is a monetary ramification. This falls under the prohibition of geneivas daas, “stealing another’s heart.”

However, the Shulchan Aruch also rules that where a person acts in a normal way, yet somebody else receives a wrong impression, there is no obligation to correct the wrong impression. Only where a person actually creates the wrong impression does he trangress the prohibition.

I think that the case of the question is similar to the latter scenario. There is no direct act of misleading that is being done; you are clearly getting paid for the marketing, and you are clearly marketing a specific brand/company, which is going to save the clients money. You are not passing on any false information, or creating any wrong impressions.

If the person in question gets the impression that the deal you are offering is the best deal available, this is not your responsibility, and you are not obligated to inform them that they can find better deals. Because you are expressely working for somebody, the fact that you have a reputation for thorough research does not imply that you are misleading people into thinking that this is the best deal around.

However, if somebody asks you if this is actually the best deal available, you will be obligated to tell the truth — that this is a good deal, but there might be/is a better deal around.

Share The Knowledge

Not what you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged Monetary Law and Charity or ask your own question.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *