I have a question regarding paying a gardener. The gardener comes at random times, and in theory gets paid per the amount of time spent each time he comes.

I say in theory, because he has never presented us with a bill! I would rather pay him each time he comes, but always seem to miss him. I have been a bit scared for a while that we are going to be hit by a huge bill, and so have asked him many times to give us a bill. He hasn’t done so yet.

The reason why I am so desperate to pay is that besides being scared about being faced with a hefty bill, that there is another gardening job that I want to do, but refuse to do anything new until we have settled our old debt. Additionally, I have set aside money for this new job, and how much I have left depends on how much I have to pay for the previous work.

He is now holding me back unfairly, in theory I could go to a new gardener to do the new job, but again, I don’t want to risk paying the new gardener, and then being hit with a larger than expected bill for the old jobs.

Is there anyway I can say to the gardener that if he doesn’t present me with a bill by such and such a date, then I consider anything I owe him to be null and void?

Answer:

You cannot void any old debts, or warn to do so, which would be untruthful.

However, you can certainly warn the gardener that if he won’t present you with a bill, you will find a different gardener, and no longer employ him. Once you tell him that you don’t want him to work any more, unless he presents you with a bill, he won’t be able to charge you for any further work that he does.

I hope that this will help.

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