I am doing an investigative study for a World Religion class and I was wondering if you could answer some of my questions about the Jewish Dietary laws and keeping Kosher. The question I am researching is: What is the significance of the different times spent in between eating meat and dairy in Judaism? I’d appreciate it if you would answer the questions below!

Do you keep Kosher? Yes

Why do you feel it is important to keep Kosher? It is one of the 613 Commandments in the Torah, the Jewish people received at Sinai from G-d, which are obligatory to Jews. These commandments has since been our life mission and guide in every aspect of life. 

Do you believe there are spiritual or physical advantages to keeping Kosher? Explain. Keeping Kosher, along with the other commandments of the Torah, is our way of connecting to G-d, emulating His ways, and earning a share in the eternal World to Come. 

What type of waiting in between milk, dairy, and meat do you practice? There are varying customs, the most common being to wait 6 hours after meat consumption until having dairy; after most dairy no waiting is required before meat. Other customs include a 3 or 5 hour wait in place of 6. 

What is you’re opinion on other waiting practices? The above mentioned are all valid customs, different traditions based on variant understanding of various Talmudic passages in the Babylonian Talmud, the basis for all practical Jewish law.

Besides it being law, why do you wait in between meals of meat and dairy? No other reason.

What do you think the significance of the waiting period in between eating milk, dairy, and meat? This is not a matter of conjecture, rather well documented Jewish law, dating back thousands of years and kept by millions across the globe. The basic idea is that the Torah prohibits the consumption of a cooked mixture of milk and meat. By Rabbinic law a waiting period was instituted so as to assure this law is not inadvertently violated. 

Thank you! I look forward to hearing from you!

Tags: kashrut milk and meat

Share The Knowledge

Not what you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged Kashrut kashrut milk and meat or ask your own question.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *