“For Bribery Blinds the Wise” – Halachos of Bribes Today

This week’s article deals with the halachic issue of bribery – a prohibition found in this week’s Parashah, which the Torah and Chazal treat with great severity. What king of bribery is prohibited? When does bribery invalidate both judge and judgment? Moreover, does the prohibition apply only to judges, or does it extend to those holding public office? These questions, and more, are discussed in this week’s article.

Assault in Torah Law

This article deals with the Torah prohibition against assault, an issue we meet in Parashas Shemos in the “two Hebrew men fighting” that Moshe saw. When is it forbidden to hit others, and when does the prohibition not apply? What is the rule concerning smiting the wicked, and how does this halachah match the narrative mentioned in our parashah? What are the parameters of the prohibition against raising one’s hand against another? We will discuss these questions, and more, in the present article.

Cruelty to Animals: The Prohibited and the Permitted

This week’s article discusses the prohibition of tzaar baalei chayim, causing pain and suffering to animals. What are the parameters of the prohibition? When is it permitted to cause pain to animals? Does a corresponding prohibition apply to humans? These questions, and more, are discussed in this week’s article. This week’s Q & A discusses issues of Kerias Shema.

Honoring Seder Night Pledges

This week’s article discusses the contemporary question of fulfilling promises—Afikoman promises. Is there a full halachic obligation to honor one’s Afikoman promise of Seder Night? Is there a difference between young and older children? Is the duress that a parent sometimes experiences in trying to retrieve the Afikoman a factor? These questions, and more, are discussed in this week’s article.

Bal Talin – Paying Wages on Time

In two places, the Torah writes about the obligations of an employer to pay his worker. In one place, there is a negative commandment not to delay payment – “Do not keep the wages of a worker with you until the next day” (Vayikra 19:13). In another place, there is a positive commandment to pay a worker on time – “Pay his wages that day, before the sun sets” (Devarim 24:15). In addition, the verse in Mishlei states “Do not tell a worker to come back tomorrow, and you have money to pay him” (3:28).
In this summary, the main issues of the prohibition, known as bal talin, are presented. This includes when to pay, the employer’s responsibility, hiring a worker through a third party, corporations and organizations, volunteered services, method of payment, and rentals.

Bal Talin – Paying Wages On Time – part 6: Different Types of Workers

In two places, the Torah writes about the obligations of an employer to pay his worker. In one place, there is a negative commandment not to delay payment – “Do not keep the wages of a worker with you until the next day” (Vayikra 19:13). In another place, there is a positive commandment to pay a worker on time – “Pay his wages that day, before the sun sets” (Devarim 24:15). In addition, the verse in Mishlei states “Do not tell a worker to come back tomorrow, and you have money to pay him” (3:28).
In this summary, the main issues of the prohibition, known as bal talin, are presented. This includes when to pay, the employer’s responsibility, hiring a worker through a third party, corporations and organizations, volunteered services, method of payment, and rentals.

08/11/2010

Bal Talin – Paying Wages On Time – part 5: Rentals

In two places, the Torah writes about the obligations of an employer to pay his worker. In one place, there is a negative commandment not to delay payment – “Do not keep the wages of a worker with you until the next day” (Vayikra 19:13). In another place, there is a positive commandment to pay a worker on time – “Pay his wages that day, before the sun sets” (Devarim 24:15). In addition, the verse in Mishlei states “Do not tell a worker to come back tomorrow, and you have money to pay him” (3:28).
In this summary, the main issues of the prohibition, known as bal talin, are presented. This includes when to pay, the employer’s responsibility, hiring a worker through a third party, corporations and organizations, volunteered services, method of payment, and rentals.

Bal Talin – Paying Wages On Time – part 4: Methods of Payment

In two places, the Torah writes about the obligations of an employer to pay his worker. In one place, there is a negative commandment not to delay payment – “Do not keep the wages of a worker with you until the next day” (Vayikra 19:13). In another place, there is a positive commandment to pay a worker on time – “Pay his wages that day, before the sun sets” (Devarim 24:15). In addition, the verse in Mishlei states “Do not tell a worker to come back tomorrow, and you have money to pay him” (3:28).
In this summary, the main issues of the prohibition, known as bal talin, are presented. This includes when to pay, the employer’s responsibility, hiring a worker through a third party, corporations and organizations, volunteered services, method of payment, and rentals.

01/11/2010

Bal Talin – Paying Wages On Time – part 3: Non Direct Employer

In two places, the Torah writes about the obligations of an employer to pay his worker. In one place, there is a negative commandment not to delay payment – “Do not keep the wages of a worker with you until the next day” (Vayikra 19:13). In another place, there is a positive commandment to pay a worker on time – “Pay his wages that day, before the sun sets” (Devarim 24:15). In addition, the verse in Mishlei states “Do not tell a worker to come back tomorrow, and you have money to pay him” (3:28).
In this summary, the main issues of the prohibition, known as bal talin, are presented. This includes when to pay, the employer’s responsibility, hiring a worker through a third party, corporations and organizations, volunteered services, method of payment, and rentals.

29/10/2010

Bal Talin – Paying Wages On Time – part 2: The Employers Responsibility

In two places, the Torah writes about the obligations of an employer to pay his worker. In one place, there is a negative commandment not to delay payment – “Do not keep the wages of a worker with you until the next day” (Vayikra 19:13). In another place, there is a positive commandment to pay a worker on time – “Pay his wages that day, before the sun sets” (Devarim 24:15). In addition, the verse in Mishlei states “Do not tell a worker to come back tomorrow, and you have money to pay him” (3:28).
In this summary, the main issues of the prohibition, known as bal talin, are presented. This includes when to pay, the employer’s responsibility, hiring a worker through a third party, corporations and organizations, volunteered services, method of payment, and rentals.

25/10/2010

Bal Talin – Paying Wages On Time – part 1: When to Pay

In two places, the Torah writes about the obligations of an employer to pay his worker. In one place, there is a negative commandment not to delay payment – “Do not keep the wages of a worker with you until the next day” (Vayikra 19:13). In another place, there is a positive commandment to pay a worker on time – “Pay his wages that day, before the sun sets” (Devarim 24:15). In addition, the verse in Mishlei states “Do not tell a worker to come back tomorrow, and you have money to pay him” (3:28).
In this summary, the main issues of the prohibition, known as bal talin, are presented. This includes when to pay, the employer’s responsibility, hiring a worker through a third party, corporations and organizations, volunteered services, method of payment, and rentals.

21/10/2010