Torah Study for Women

In Parashas Toldos we find Rivkah going to “seek out [the word of] Hashem” concerning the twins that agitated in her womb (Bereishis 25:22). The verse does not reveal where she went, but Rashi (based on Chazal) explains that she visited the beis midrash of Shem.

Different passages of the Midrash teach us that Yitzchak, Yaakov, Yosef and Yehudah all studied at different periods in the study halls of Shem and Eiver. Although Rivkah went there to receive Divine counsel, neither she, nor any other woman, is recorded as having taken part in the actual study of the renowned study hall. The field of Torah study (even before the Torah was given) was reserved for the Fathers of the nation; the Mothers were not involved in it.

In the present article we will discuss the issue of Torah study for women. Is there a prohibition against Torah study for women? Is it permitted for a woman to study Torah on her own? Is there a difference between different parts of Torah? Is there room to distinguish in this matter between past generations and our own?

09/11/2015

parashas Lech Lecha – Self‐Injury and Cosmetic Surgery in Halachah

If Avraham Avinu performed all the mitzvos of the Torah, why did he not circumcise himself before being instructed to do so by Hashem? One answer given to this question leads us to investigate the prohibition of injuring oneself. Is there a prohibition of self-injury? What is the nature of the prohibition, and which cases are included in it? And what is the halachic status of cosmetic) plastic) surgery, which involved causing an injury to oneself? These questions ,and more, are considered in this week’s article.

Selichos Primer

    As Rosh Hashana approaches we gradually introduce daily reminders to prepare for this Day of Judgement. Starting Rosh Chodesh Elul, the shofar’s blow resonates in our shuls and… Read more »

03/09/2015

Keeping Your Word

In this week’s parsha we are cautioned to not take lightly what we say. The Torah states: “Actualize that which emerges from your lips” (Devorim 23:24). The Torah teaches us… Read more »

27/08/2015

Shoftim – Of Signs and Lots

This week’s Parashah includes the instruction to be “tamim” with Hashem. What does this instruction involve? Does it prohibit consulting a horoscope? What about relying on omens, good or bad? And what of using various forms of goralos? These, and other related issues, are studied in this week’s article.

Shmittas Kesafim – Foregoing Loans

As the Shmittah year approaches its close, one last mitzvah awaits us. This mitzvah, unlike the rest of the laws of Shmittah, is completely independent of agriculture and produce. Rather its intention is to strengthen our character and desire to give (see Sefer Hachinuch Mitzvah 477). Furthermore, this mitzvah entrenches in us the awareness that everything belongs to Hashem, rendering unfit the pursuit of material wealth (Tumim 67:1). The Torah tells us, “At the end of seven years you will institute a remission [shmittah]. This is the matter of the of the remission, every creditor shall forgo his claim for what he has lent his friend, he shall not press his friend or his brother, for He has proclaimed a remission for Hashem, you may demand payment from a gentile, and that which you have with your brother, you shall relinquish” (Devorim ch. 15).

The mitzvah of shmittas kesafim, forgoing claims on loans, has many facets and halochos. Does this Mitzvah apply today? Does it obligate one who lives in chutz l’aretz? When does it take effect? If I lent someone my car, do I have to let him keep it? I borrowed tomatoes from a neighbor; do I have to give them back? What if I want to pay back my loan, is that permitted or am I in violation of the Torah’s will? Bezras Hashem we will clarify these questions and discuss other ideas related to this mitzvah.

13/08/2015

Ekev – Love the Convert: How?

This week’s Parashah includes the mitzvah of loving the convert–a mitzvah that requires much clarification. Does the mitzvah imply an obligation to give precedence to a convert over a Jew from birth? Does it include an instruction to accept converts? And how does the love of a convert differ from the love of all Jews? These issues, and more, are discussed in the weekly article.

Words that Hurt: Torah Laws of Onaas Devarim

The Torah teaches: “When you sell something to your fellow, or buy from your fellow, do no wrong one man his fellow” (Vayikra 25:14). In a subsequent verse, the Torah states: “You shall not wrong one another.”

Dwelling on the two verses, the Gemara explains that the latter verse refers to onaas devarim. This means that causing somebody else emotional pain, by means of verbal, written, or any other form of communication, is a Torah prohibition. This basic prohibition is recorded by the Rambam and by the Shulchan Aruch (Choshen Mishpat 228:1).

The Gemara, moreover, writes that the prohibition of onaas devarim is more stringent even than the Torah transgression of monetary onaah (overcharging).

Several reasons are mentioned for this: The offense is worse since it attacks the person himself, rather than his money. Also the pasuk mentions the fear of G-d in the instruction of onaas devarim, which implies an added degree of severity. And finally, monetary wrongs can be restored by paying back, whereas anguish and grief caused, can never be recalled.

The Gemara adds that the punishment for causing suffering is executed more swiftly than that of monetary wrongs. Hashem, the Gemara explains, hears the call of one who calls Him out of pain and anguish.

In this article we will discuss the parameters and the laws of the prohibition of onaas devarim: Is the offense punishable by Beis Din? Which people does the Torah single out for special care in this context? Is it permitted to insult somebody else in retaliation for verbal assault? These questions, among others, are discussed below.

26/05/2015

Laws of the Kippa

The most easily recognized symbol of Jewish identity – for men – is doubtless the kippa or yarmulke. Orthodox men always wear a kippa, and even non-observant men are generally… Read more »

14/05/2015

Behar – A Good Deal or a Torah Proscription

I am looking for a property to buy in Jerusalem. Recently, a friend notified me of a potential bargain: an elderly person, who is clearly unaware of current market prices, is selling his apartment for a very cheap price, approximately two-thirds the market value. May I purchase the apartment for the suggested price, or must I inform the buyer that the price is too low, and make an offer that reflects current market values?